Maharìa-en

Maharìa

 

Ormai ‘stu fuocu 

Nun s’astuta cchiù

Roppu ca mi struppiavu buonu

Aspittannu chi sa cu

 

Roppu ca scappavu assicutatu a tutti banni

Roppu ca pinzava ca ormai nun sapieva ririri cchiù

Roppu ca spartivu a me spiranza a milli banni

Roppu ca pinsava ca sta vita nun mi capieva cchiù

Niscisti tu

 

Pi cunsumari a mia

Ma chi mi cummini tu?

è una maharia

E nun capisciu s’iddu tu niscisti

Pi cunsumari a mia

Ma chi mi cummini tu?

è una maharia

E viru tutti cosi blu

 

Iu ca ti taliassi finu all’alba, finu all’ossa

I to occhi m’arristaru impiccicati runnegghiè

Iu viaggiassi supra a piedde tua comu si fussi ri luna

Sciddicassi supra i cianchi e mi pirdissi cchiù ddà

Ma comu si fa?

 

Pi cunsumari a mia

Ma chi mi cummini tu?

è una maharia

E nun capisciu s’iddu tu u sapievi

Ca iavi a cunsumari a mia

Si una maharia

E nun capisciu nienti cchiù

Maharìa

 

Now this fire 

Doesn’t go out anymore

After I hurt myself so much

Waiting for who knows who

 

After I fled, pestered everywhere

After I thought I couldn’t laugh anymore

After I dropped my hope in a thousand places

After I thought this life didn’t fit me anymore

You came out of nowhere

 

To haunt me (1)

How do you do that?

it’s sorcery (2)

And I don’t understand if you came out of nowhere

To haunt me

How do you do that?

it’s sorcery

And everything turns blue

 

I would gaze at you ‘till sunrise, to the bone

Your eyes held on me, all over me

I would glide all over your skin as if it was made of moon

 

I would slide on your hips, lose myself a little further

What the hell?

 

You haunt me

How do you do that?

It’s sorcery

And I don’t understand if you knew

That you were going to ruin me

You are sorcery

And I’m completely lost

 

(1) Translator’s Note: the whole album is spread with idiomatic phrases from the Palermo dialect; the author and I have decided to translate some of them literally, if the poetic imagery evoked is clear enough to convey the right meaning of a sentence; otherwise, I have taken the effort to find a British-English version of the idiom or interjection.

 

(2) The “maharìa” is Sicilian folk magic, a set of sorceries and spells cast by the “mahàro”, to establish relations with the irrational world and manipulate it. It mostly come from the rural environment and act as a sort of proto-psychoanalysis “(the maharìa) helps its users to obtain comfort and consolation, to vent frustrations, and reflect on the means and the meanings of one’s life”. (G. Carleo, director)